stuart reid 'in transit'
April 4 to April 30, 2015

The TTC subway at Union Station, Toronto's main public transportation hub, is acquiring an extraordinary, world-class art installation, which is presently being installed and will be unveiled in time for the Pan Am Games. Created by award-winning Canadian artist Stuart Reid, zones of immersion is a 7-foot high by 500-foot long richly worked glass wall that portrays the people who "ride the rocket" every day.

The large drawings in this exhibition are based upon small sketches drawn while riding the subway. These works (india ink on mylar) informed and developed the glass project.

resigned (detail)
resigned (detail)
laminated sandblasted glass and graphite
life over lifestyle
life over lifestyle
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
invisible
invisible
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
tiny nap / big man
tiny nap / big man
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
reading music
reading music
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
disappearing crowd
disappearing crowd
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
leaning (detail)
leaning (detail)
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
his mother (detail)
his mother (detail)
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
texting
texting
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
cellist
cellist
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
layered conversation (detail)
layered conversation (detail)
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
staring back
staring back
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
long love
long love
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
on their mind
on their mind
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
human flow
human flow
india ink and graphite on mylar, 43" × 84"
different beauty (detail)
different beauty (detail)
india ink and graphite on mylar, 42" × 84"
reading his security brief
reading his security brief
india ink on mylar, 42" × 84"


Slideshow

'in transit' – Artist's Statement

These are drawings of people riding or waiting for the subway, which were part of a larger project for a 500' long glass mural "zones of immersion" for Toronto's TTC Union Station.

In the 'drawing in and drawing out' that this work engages there is a push and pull between control and accident - the subconscious and the conscious. That, for me, is the origin of drawing - a line that goes from eye to mind to hand to page.

As these drawings evolved, from quick recorded glimpses to full scaled works of art, the physical aspects of the transit experience - noticed in long or short rides within the city, became a found gestalt to work with ... the sounds, the vibrations, the changing rhythms or speeds, the patterns of darkness and light.

These works specifically reflect on the human condition within urban transit - a world both intensely collective and remarkably isolated... a world where the anonymity of the no man's zone offers us an unvarnished glimpse into the face, and hence perhaps a sliver of the psyche of one's fellow passengers. I am interested in drawing that reveals the interrelationship of the 'self' and the 'other' with both empathy and freedom.

— Stuart M. Reid, March 2015

'in transit' – by Sky Goodden

Stuart Reid's in transit explores the common experience of inner­city transit through the artist's process, media transfiguration, and historical precedents.

The subway goes just about everywhere, but we stand still. Indeed, in transit, we are more ourselves than anywhere. The dark reflective windows mirroring us back to ourselves, the tunnel walls describing nothing. We are with ourselves, of ourselves, but in the company of others.

Over the course of three years. Stuart Reid rode the subway. He moved among the cars. sat variously and indeterminately, and drew. Having been awarded Toronto's largest public art commission to date - a 500 ft. corridor of mouth-blown, hand­ painted, India inked and kiln-skinned stained glass to run the length of Union Station's subway platform - he was drafting. First preparing the proposal, then, later, proposing the design. The final work, titled Zones of Immersion, will span the city's central station in colour, gesture, and scrawling text, barring every opportunity for advertisement and aesthetic imposition, and returning transit users- often beginning or terminating their subterranean ride at this very anchor station - to themselves. However, the images produced in this installation's preparation, the series of which is titled In Transit, are of a piece. And while the commissioned project intermittently went fallow over the course of its assignment and negotiation, these images provide more than a seed.

Reid's evocation of our city's "third class carriage" is rooted in a history that these images' very line and media evoke—Honoré Daumier, Gustave Courbet, José Clemente Orozsco—and which their nod to both Social Realism and Impressionism implies.

However, Reid's subjects embody a common experience made contemporary. Scrawled with clipped texts of overheard conversation and passing allusion, Reid's works capture the present moment through language. He circles our intimacy, investigates our autonomy, and portrays the human connections that are both performed and pressed between stations. How do we use the space we travel in order to get the time we need? With his subjects either moving out of frame, responding through posture or retreat, crushed against one another or framed alone, Reid produces a record of the river of movement that happens beneath our feet one of isolation in crowds, community and class.

— Sky Goodden is the founding editor of MOMUS. She was the founding editor of BLOUIN ARTINFO Canada, which she ran from 2011to 2014. Goodden regularly writes for Canadian Art, Modern Painters, Art + Auction, and C Magazine, among others. She was the 2010 Editorial Resident at Canadian Art, and holds an MFA in Criticism and Curatorial Practice from OCAD University.

Stuart Reid – Artist Biography

Stuart Reid was born in London Ontario. He studied with Paterson Ewen, Greg Curnoe, Richard DeMarco, Patrick Reyntiens and Joseph Beuys. He holds a B.A. (fine arts ) from the University of Guelph and a Masters of Architecture from UCLA. He is a professor at OCAD University. His many major public artworks include works for Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Intercontinental Toronto Centre, Salzburg Congress. His artwork at St. James' Cathedral was unveiled by Queen Elizabeth in July 1997. He is the great nephew of the early Canadian painter G.A.Reid.

Major Aquisitions of Work by Public Institutions

2015 UNION STATION, Toronto, Ontario
“zones of immersion” winner international competition
   subway platform wall: 7' × 500' × 3' — translucent glass mural
2006 BLOORVIEW KIDS REHAB, Toronto, Ontario
“to walk these halls”
   4 stories breezeway louvres @ 4' × 50' × 1' — silver stained & laminated glass
“to make this voyage”
   exterior entry canopy: 8.5' × 30' — silver stained & laminated glass
2001 SALZBURG CONGRESS, Salzburg, Austria
“homage to Mozart” winner international competition
   3 storey enameled & fired curved glass 20' × 40'
1998 LIVING ARTS CENTRE, Mississauga, Ontario
“dance of Venus” winner international competition
   main foyer: 30' × 150' etched & enameled mouthblown glass
1991 CITY OF LONDON, London, Ontario
“people and the City” winner international competition (w/ D Balabanoff)
   civic monument: 13' × 33' × 7' — waterjet-cut bronze & limestone

Permanent Installations

2014 PETERS STUDIOS, Paderborn, Germany
“Gethsemane”
   conference area artwork: 5' × 7' etched, enameled & laminated glass
2003 INTERCONTINENTAL, TORONTO CENTRE, Toronto, Ontario
“urban ribbon”
   reception desk art feature: 9' × 20' translucent enameled/fired float glass
“liquid veil”
   bar/restaurant art feature: 10' × 18' acid-etched mouthblown glass
1997 ST. JAMES CATHEDRAL, Toronto, Ontario
“The Calling of St. James”
   narthex: 11' × 24' stained glass window — dedicated by Queen Elizabeth II June 29,1997
1985 BYRON UNITED CHURCH, London, Ontario
“light shafts”
   sanctuary: 12 stained glass windows @ 2' × 12'

Selected Exhibitions

2015 GALLERY GEVIK, Toronto, Ontario
“in transit”
2007 CANADIAN CLAY & GLASS GALLERY, Waterloo, Ontario
“stumbling home from banff”
2005 MATERIAL MATTERS GALLERY, Toronto, Ontario
“torn curtain, tangled lines”
2004 GLYDE HALL, THE BANFF CENTRE, Banff, Alberta
“exiting — a requiem”
2003 FUNDACIO JAUME II EL JUST, Monasterio De Santa Maria Valldigna, Spain
“El Arte de las Vidrieras”
2001 AUGSBURG CATHEDRAL, Augsburg, Germany
“the coloured light”
1997 CENTRE INTERNATIONAL DU VITRAIL, Chartres, France
“six voix / six voices”

Daphne OdjigDaphne Odjig, Canadian Indigenous Artist and Icon Dies at 97. Click here for more details.

Odjig is frequently referred to as the "Grandmother of Indigenous Art." She has been the recipient of many awards, honours and recognitions for her works, to name a few: The Order of Canada, the Governor General's Award, and eight Honorary Doctorates. Her works have been shown in the National Gallery of Canada, The McMichael Canadian Art Collection, the Canadian Museum of Civilization and the Art Gallery of Ontario.


She established the first native-run fine art print house in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1971. Known as 'Odjig Indian Prints,' this print house was so successful that it evolved into an Indigenous gallery space in 1974, called the New Warehouse Gallery, run by Odjig and her husband, Chester Beavon. She was also a founding member of the Indian Group of Seven. This artistic group's purpose was to promote Contemporary Indigenous art and artists.

Alex JanvierAlex Janvier's major retrospective, "Alex Janvier: Modern Indigenous Master" is now on display at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa.

Alex Janvier is one of Canada's most acclaimed contemporary Indigenous artists. His career of sixty-five years has yielded thousands of paintings, and more than twenty-five murals and public commissions. This retrospective of his artwork is on display from 25 November 2016 to 17 April 2017.

(Photo credit: Kim Griffiths) Click here for more details.