Leslie Drysdale

Icarus
Icarus, 1996
bronze, 52" × 20" × 21"
Icarus Study
Icarus (study)
bronze, 13.5" x 5.5" x 5.5"
Birdman
Birdman, 2011
bronze, 13 x 11 x 6

Slideshow

Leslie Drysdale – Artist Biography

Leslie Drysdale was born in Hamilton in 1961. He graduated with an Honors Bachelor of Fine Art at the University of Guelph in 1985 specializing in sculpture. Les has worked as a full time artist and sculptor ever since. Some of his public commissioned sculptures can be seen outside the Toronto Police Headquarters, Toronto, the entrance of Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital, Burlington, McMaster Teaching Hospital, Hamilton, St. Pauls Parish , Burlington, St. Peters School , Barrie, inside The Legislative Assembly of Ontario, Queens Park, The fountain sculpture of Augustus Jones Chief surveyor of the Niagara Peninsula in the Town Square of Stoney Creek, The Toltec Warriors for the TTC ROM stop in Toronto Ontario.

Drysdale's sculptures have been shown in galleries across the country and can be found in private collections in Europe, the US and Canada. He is currently represented in Toronto by Gallery Gevik in Toronto. He also teaches courses in Drawing and Sculpture at the Burlington Art Centre and Dundas Valley School of Art. He was commissioned after an international competition held by the Serbian Orthodox Church of Niagara Falls and The Niagara Parks Commission to create the Monument to Nikola Tesla, the inventor of AC electricity and designer of the first hydro electric plant. The sculpture is located in Victoria Park overlooking Niagara Falls. His most recent public commission, unveiled 2009, includes a sculpture for the new City of Kitchener-Waterloo Police Headquarters,. He is currently working on a commission for the Town of Fort Erie , a monument dedicated to the Underground Railroad and those that escaped slavery in the mid19th century . His latest sculpture has been selected as the center piece for the Dundas Driving Park in Dundas, Ontario.

In my work I have tried to adhere to these principles and create works that do have a life of their own which can arouse intensely impassioned reactions from viewers. Most of my work is based on mythical themes, which I feel are timeless ideals that speak about the human condition, our strengths and indestructible spirit and yet our vulnerabilities and morality. My approach to each work is an intuitive one, reacting to the natural thrusts and stresses of the figure, interlacing textured forms with elegant curves and planes of figure and drapery. The result is an overall dynamic rhythm between anatomical reality, texture and form, creating a dramatic and powerful sculpture.
— Leslie Drysdale

Daphne OdjigDaphne Odjig, Canadian Indigenous Artist and Icon Dies at 97. Click here for more details.

Odjig is frequently referred to as the "Grandmother of Indigenous Art." She has been the recipient of many awards, honours and recognitions for her works, to name a few: The Order of Canada, the Governor General's Award, and eight Honorary Doctorates. Her works have been shown in the National Gallery of Canada, The McMichael Canadian Art Collection, the Canadian Museum of Civilization and the Art Gallery of Ontario.


She established the first native-run fine art print house in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1971. Known as 'Odjig Indian Prints,' this print house was so successful that it evolved into an Indigenous gallery space in 1974, called the New Warehouse Gallery, run by Odjig and her husband, Chester Beavon. She was also a founding member of the Indian Group of Seven. This artistic group's purpose was to promote Contemporary Indigenous art and artists.

Alex JanvierAlex Janvier's major retrospective, "Alex Janvier: Modern Indigenous Master" is now on display at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa.

Alex Janvier is one of Canada's most acclaimed contemporary Indigenous artists. His career of sixty-five years has yielded thousands of paintings, and more than twenty-five murals and public commissions. This retrospective of his artwork is on display from 25 November 2016 to 17 April 2017.

(Photo credit: Kim Griffiths) Click here for more details.