Pauline Conley

Airmail
Airmail
mixed media on canvas, 36" × 40"
Al-Forjasold
Al-Forja
mixed media on canvas, 20" × 24"
Harbour
Harbour
mixed media on canvas, 4' × 5'
Jonesy
Jonesy
mixed media on canvas, 24" × 24"
Tartlette
Tartlette
mixed media on canvas, 24" × 24"
Caroline
Caroline
mixed media on canvas, 24" × 24"
Red Lastsold
Red Last
mixed media on canvas, 24" × 24"
Terra Mama
Terra Mama
mixed media on canvas, 24" × 24"
Sugar Whiffsold
Sugar Whiff
mixed media on canvas, 36" × 48"

Slideshow

Pauline Conley – Artist Biography

Born and raised in Vancouver, Pauline Conley studied fine art and English, and lived on Vancouver Island for several years before moving to Kingston, Ontario.

As a painter she is drawn to the power of the non-representational. In recent years, her images have begun to relax into a sort of representation of the imagined. First, the horizon found its way into her work – the sight line which is the friction point between the elements, and between the known and the unknown. It is a powerful cultural and visual reference point upon which the metaphor of landscape hangs. The horizon eventually became a line in the air, and this line evokes the clothesline, the jet stream, mapped domains, and the ubiquitous bird on a wire. These are the grid lines of our lives – the divisions of space that are as familiar and comforting as the horizon. 

In the very recent past, a deconstruction of the motifs Conley had been working with has taken hold. Her focus has shifted to the grids and patterns themselves as evocative montages of everyday life - both routine and divine.

Daphne OdjigDaphne Odjig, Canadian Indigenous Artist and Icon Dies at 97. Click here for more details.

Odjig is frequently referred to as the "Grandmother of Indigenous Art." She has been the recipient of many awards, honours and recognitions for her works, to name a few: The Order of Canada, the Governor General's Award, and eight Honorary Doctorates. Her works have been shown in the National Gallery of Canada, The McMichael Canadian Art Collection, the Canadian Museum of Civilization and the Art Gallery of Ontario.


She established the first native-run fine art print house in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1971. Known as 'Odjig Indian Prints,' this print house was so successful that it evolved into an Indigenous gallery space in 1974, called the New Warehouse Gallery, run by Odjig and her husband, Chester Beavon. She was also a founding member of the Indian Group of Seven. This artistic group's purpose was to promote Contemporary Indigenous art and artists.

Alex JanvierAlex Janvier's major retrospective, "Alex Janvier: Modern Indigenous Master" is now on display at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa.

Alex Janvier is one of Canada's most acclaimed contemporary Indigenous artists. His career of sixty-five years has yielded thousands of paintings, and more than twenty-five murals and public commissions. This retrospective of his artwork is on display from 25 November 2016 to 17 April 2017.

(Photo credit: Kim Griffiths) Click here for more details.